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Qualifications

Transforming agriculture requires passionate professionals from every sector.

Ayanda with colleagues in Kigali

Serving one million customers takes more than just agricultural expertise (though we have that too). Our people come from a broad range of industries and backgrounds, but generally share a few qualities that we value. We’re interested not only in your resume and past experience, but also in your ability to lead change and thrive in our culture.

What We Look For

Across all roles, we seek professionals who demonstrate the ability to grow quickly, bring a passionate and positive attitude to their teams, and who can solve complicated problems with independence. In particular, we seek:

  • Diverse experiences and perspectives. Diversity makes us stronger, so we seek professionals with unique backgrounds or perspectives. We especially value leaders who deeply understand the farming communities we serve.
  • Humility and self-awareness. We keep farmers at the heart of our daily work. We look for compassionate, humble leaders who put the mission before the team, and the team before themselves. Our best leaders bring out the best in others, engage thoughtfully with input, and use feedback as a fuel for growth.
  • Independent problem-solving. In agriculture, each growing season brings new challenges. We look for people who can solve problems and propose future innovations without being asked. We value critical thinking, curiosity, the ability to analyze complex situations with data, and a drive to prioritize what matters most for farmers.
  • Thorough execution. We roll up our sleeves to deliver products to our customers in deeply rural areas. We look for people who rise to challenges and get stuff done. We run on strong systems, effective plans, and a fierce commitment to seeing things through.
  • Clear communication. We must earn the trust of farmers and the goodwill of governments. We look for people who can motivate their audiences and share ideas in a clear and concise way. We value logical arguments, crisp writing, and the ability to rally a team behind a vision. 

Job Levels and Titles

Staff Appreciation Day in Rubengera, Rwanda, 2019

All of our roles fall into one of seven broad job grades, ranging from entry-level field officers to our directors. Everyone in the same job level and location, regardless of nationality, earns comparable pay and has the same opportunities to advance. While specific tasks and titles vary by job, the job grades help us ensure broad consistency across countries and functions. 

Job Grades 1-3 (Titles Vary). These job grades include both roles in the field and in the office, typically focused on providing customer service directly to farmers or execution support for program operations. Sample responsibilities include managing a team of field officers, processing payroll, or collecting data on field trials.

Job Grade 4 (Specialists). These office roles manage projects within a department, typically focused on short-term project planning and quality execution. Specialists create quality work products with little support, and permanently solve problems. Sample responsibilities include managing our call center, leading local media relations, or testing new farm products.

Job Grade 5 (Associates/Analysts). These roles typically manage complex workstrands or small departments. Associates drive significant innovation, plan year-long projects, and manage multiple initiatives concurrently. Sample responsibilities include scouting new areas of program expansion, collecting repayments from 100,000 farmers, or driving down procurement costs.

Job Grade 6 (Managers). These roles typically manage large departments and teams. Managers often lead global strategy, significant change management, and the success of critical business units. Sample responsibilities include launching a pilot program in a new country, designing our global client protection standards, or developing a long-term strategy on soil health. 

Job Grade 7 (Directors). These roles typically manage an entire country program, complex division, or large global team. Directors are typically responsible for organizational strategy broadly and the success of key organizational initiatives. Sample responsibilities include developing a five-year strategy for a country or function and managing budgets over USD $1 million.